Literature In English – SS1, SS2 & SS3 Curriculum; Scheme of Work; Assessment Tests

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Aims and Objectives of Teaching Literature at the Senior Secondary School Level:
Literature in English should be taught at the Senior Secondary School level in order to:

(i) give students a rich and well-rounded humanistic education. This can be achieved through broadening the cultural horizon & students by exposing them to works that are varied in perspective and yet universal in application;
(ii) re-enforce the English Language skill already acquired by the students by exposing them to language in action in literary tests and works;
(iii) expose students to the beauty and potentials of language;
(iv) expose students to healthy human values and attributes;
(v) equip the students to develop the capacity for independent thought and Judgment;
(vi) encourage attempts at creative writing as a means of understanding the creative process and appreciating the principle of creativity, especially for those who can benefit from it;
(vii) develop students’ ability to respond appropriately and Independently to literary works;
(viii) inculcate In the students the entertainment and instructive values of literature as a follow-up to the literary skills learnt In the Junior Secondary School;
(ix) prepare the students to pass literature in the Senior Secondary School Examinations and the Joint Matriculation Examination and also to prepare them for work.

Aims and Objectives of Teaching Literary Appreciation at the Senior Secondary School Level.
Literary Appreciation should be taught in order to:

(i) develop the students’ critical sensitivity to literature by introducing them to the techniques of decoding literary works;
(ii) develop skills in literature that lead to independent assessment of prose, drama and poetry. These can achieve through:

(a) teaching students to discover the significance of works literary contexts; ,
(b) identifying figures of speech and other literary devices and terms and their effectiveness in a given text;
(c) identifying the effect of mood and tone in a literary contexts;
(d) teaching the special syntax of poetry;
(e) introducing students to various forms of prose, drama and poetry.

Aims and Objectives of Teaching Drama
What is Drama? Drama is representation of life, usually on a stage. Its essence is not to present real event but a representation of a real or an imagined event. The element in representation that distinguishes the drama from other forms of art is impersonation i.e. the assumption by human beings of personalities, characters, natures or entities other than their own.

Action is another essential element of drama. The action may be physical (e.g. change or status of relationship or circumstances), or psychological (e.g. change state of mind, emotion or Intellectual attitude). So long as the action represent concerns on impersonated character or entity, drama exist (See Millet and Bontloy, The Art of the Drama, published by Appleton-Century-crofts, Inc New York).

The teaching of drama at the Senior Secondary School Level is therefore necessary so as to:

(i) relate drama to life by demonstrating hoe central action is to human experience and also study the motives behind human actions
(ii) examine the inter-relationship and the differences between action in real life action in drama, and demonstrate the differences between dramatic truth and truth in real life;
(iii) examine the difference between plot and story;
(iv) introduce and develop ‘acting’ in sketches;
(v) analyse action as a means of demonstrating and understanding element of drama, such as:

(a) Dramatic Techniques: dialogues, scene development soliloquy, symbolism, fore-shadowing, processions, choruses, prologues, movement, etc.
(b) Dramatic Structure (plot): exposition, climax, anticlimax, denouncement (or resolution);
(c) Characterisation: types of characters; how to understand characters:- What they say, what they do and what others say about them;
(d) Dramatic irony: situational or verbal;
(e) Setting: temporal (era of the play) and spatial (setting on stage)

(vi) analyse the use of language in drama: prosaic and poetic diction i.e. the way the characters speak (figurative language, word choice, choice of structures).

Aims and Objectives of Teaching Poetry
What is poetry? Poetry in an expression of human experience in a rhythmic form that is natural human beings. It reflects man’s desire to use above the mundane aspects of living and man’s increasing quest for encapsulating great thought and feelings in robust fanciful and symbolic language. It is therefore to teach literature in other to:

(i) expose different kinds poems as a means of demonstrating the richness and variety of poetic expression and ability (form to be examined may include the lyric, the epic, the ballad, the heroic couplet etc.);
(ii) identity and evaluate the various 1lnuistic and thematic components of poetry both in themselves and in relation to unified poetic expression such as imagery metaphors etc.
(iii) encourage poetic creative expression through attempt at writing poems, and through text recitals aimed at capturing the essence of the poems;
(iv) compare and contrast poetry with other literary forms;
(v) encourage independent reading and evaluation of poetry;
(vi) prepare the students for the Senior Secondary School Certificate Examinations, the Joint Matriculation Examinations and for work.

Aims and Objectives of Teaching Prose at Senior Secondary School Level;
What is prose? Like all genres of literature prose reflects human experiences. It is expressed in prosaic form, that is, in full sentences, and is usually narrative in nature.

Prose should be taught at all level in order to enable students to:

(i) identify those elements in creative prose which enhance a reader’s response to specific texts, such as subject matter, characterization, theme, setting, plot and Language;
(ii) recall indents in fiction that are probable in life and whose interpretation can be value since fiction is imaginative writing;
(iii) be exposed to various/different ideas/values embodied in fictions.

Literature in English comprises of three papers – Papers 1, 2 and 3.

Papers 1 and 2 is a composite paper and will be taken at one sitting.

Paper 1 will be a multiple choice objective test. It will contain fifty questions distributed as follows:
(a) Twenty questions on General Knowledge of Literature;
(b) Five questions on an unseen prose passage;
(c) Five questions on an unseen poem;
(d) Twenty context questions on the prescribed Shakespearean text.

Candidates will be required to answer all the questions within 1 hour for 50 marks.

Paper 2 will be an essay test with two sections; Sections A and B. Section A will be on African Prose and Section B on Non-African Prose.

Two essay questions will be set on each of the novels prescribed for study. Candidates shall be required to answer one question only from each section within 1 hour 15 minutes for 50 marks.

Paper 3 will be on the Drama and Poetry components of the syllabus. It will be put into four sections, Sections A, B, C and D as follows:
Section A: African Drama
Section B: Non-African Drama
Section C: African Poetry
Section D: Non-African Poetry

There shall be two questions on each of the prescribed drama texts for Sections A and B. There shall also be two questions for each of the poetry sections ie Sections C and D.

Candidates shall be required to answer one question from each of the sections, making a total of four questions. The paper will take 2 hours 30 minutes to complete and will carry 100 marks.

Note:
(i) The Unseen Prose passage for Paper 1 shall be about 120 – 150 words long.
(ii) Only context questions shall be set on the Shakespearean text. The context questions will test such items as theme, characterization, style and setting in the Shakespearean text.
(iii) No essay question shall be set on the Shakespearean text.

Approved Reading Texts (WAEC and NECO) for 2021 – 2025

African Prose
(1) Second Chance Citizens – By Buichi Emecheata
(2) Unexpected Joy At Dawn – By Alex Agyei-Agyiri (2018 Edition)

Non-African Prose
(1) Invisible man – By Ralph Ejison
(2) Weathering Heights – By Emily Bronte

Shakespearean Text: Midsummer Night Dream

Non-African Drama
(1) Look Back In Anger – By John Osborne
(2) Fences – By August Wilson

African Drama
(1) Let Me Die Alone – By John K. Kargbo
(2) The Lion and the Jewel – By Wole Soyinka

African Poetry
(1) “Black Woman” – By Leopold Sedar Sunghor
(2) “The Leader and the Led” – By Niyi Osundare
(3) “The Grieved Lands” – By Agostinho Neto
(4) “The Song of the Woman of My Land” – By Oumar Farouk Sasey
(5) “Rider of the Treasure Trove” – By Lade Wosomu
(6) “A Government Driver On His Retirement” – By Onu Chibuike

Non-African Poetry
(1) “The Good Merrow” – By John Donne
(2) “Caged Birds” – By Maya Angelou
(3) “The Journey of the Magi” – By T.S. Eliot
(4) “Do Not Go Gentle Into The Good Night” – By Dylan Thomas
(5) “Binsey Poplars (Felled 1879)” – By G.M. Hopkins
(6) “Bat” – By David H. Lawrence

 

SS1 Literature In English – 1st Term Scheme of Work

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS1 1st Term Literary Appreciation General Introduction to Literature
William Shakespeare Midsummer Night Dream





SS1 Literature In English – 2nd Term Scheme of Work

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS1 2nd Term African Prose

(1) Second Chance Citizens – By Buichi Emecheata

OR

(2) Unexpected Joy At Dawn – By Alex Agyei-Agyiri (2018 Edition)

Non-African Prose (1) Invisible man – By Ralph Ejison

OR

(2) Weathering Heights – By Emily Bronte




SS1 Literature In English – 3rd Term Scheme of Work

 

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS1 1st Term African Drama (1) Let Me Die Alone – By John K. Kargbo

OR

(2) The Lion and the Jewel – By Wole Soyinka

Non-African Drama (1) Look Back In Anger – By John Osborne

OR

(2) Fences – By August Wilson





SS2 Literature In English – 1st Term Scheme of Work

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS2 1st Term African Poetry (1) “Black Woman” – By Leopold Sedar Sunghor
(2) “The Leader and the Led” – By Niyi Osundare
(3) “The Grieved Lands” – By Agostinho Neto




SS2 Literature In English – 2nd Term Scheme of Work

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS2 2nd Term African Poetry (4) “The Song of the Woman of My Land” – By Oumar Farouk Sasey
(5) “Rider of the Treasure Trove” – By Lade Wosomu
(6) “A Government Driver On His Retirement” – By Onu Chibuike




SS2 Literature In English – 3rd Term Scheme of Work

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS2 3rd Term Non-African Poetry (1) “The Good Merrow” – By John Donne
(2) “Caged Birds” – By Maya Angelou
(3) “The Journey of the Magi” – By T.S. Eliot





SS3 Literature In English – 1st Term Scheme of Work

Class Term Main Topics Contents
SS3 1st Term Non-African Poetry (4) “Do Not Go Gentle Into The Good Night” – By Dylan Thomas
(5) “Binsey Poplars (Felled 1879)” – By G.M. Hopkins
(6) “Bat” – By David H. Lawrence

 

SS3 Literature In English – 2nd Term Scheme of Work – Revision


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